Easy Winter Crafts

Easy Winter Crafts on Footnotes

On chilly winter days, keep the kids busy with crafts inspired by the fun of the frosty season. With snow, icicles and festive celebrations, you have plenty of themes for winning projects. Not only will you create family memories, but you’ll also have lasting mementos of your children’s creativity.

Snow Folk and Bundled People

Save toilet paper and paper towel rolls for your youngsters to transform into a cast of winter characters. Provide your kids with nontoxic, washable craft paint to paint the rolls white for snowmen or bright colors for kids in winter outerwear. Help young children paint faces and buttons, and demonstrate how to tie strips of felt around the rolls for scarves. Cut the toe sections from an old pair of socks to make hats. Arrange the completed figures atop a bit of white cotton or artificial snow and admire the kid-created centerpiece.

Snowman Magnets

Mix up some hot chocolate and put on seasonal music. It’s time to gather wax paper, white school glue, silver glitter, sequins, black construction paper, red yarn and scissors to make snowman magnets. Spread a sheet of wax paper onto a flat work surface. Show your youngsters how to make a snowman outline on the waxed paper using the glue. It’s as simple as drawing three connecting circles, each one smaller than the one before — the largest on the bottom and the smallest on the top. Have the children fill in the circles with glue to cover the entire circle area evenly. Before the glue dries, pass out the silver glitter or sequins and watch your kids have fun as they sprinkle glitter and arrange sequins on the glue surface. Show them how to place black sequins on the head for eyes and down the middle circle for buttons. Ask older children to cut out top hats from black construction paper and stick them on each snowman’s head. Cut 3-inch pieces of red yarn and show little ones how to put one on each snowman as a scarf. Wait one to two days for the snowmen to dry and then peel them off the wax paper carefully. Attach adhesive magnets to the backs of the snowmen to make refrigerator magnets your family can enjoy throughout the season.

Beaded Snowflake Ornaments

Bring the beauty of snowflakes indoors using white chenille stems and white or silver pony beads for a kid-friendly project. Cut four lengths of chenille stems, each 5 inches long. Cross two chenille stems in the center to make an “X” shape and twist them together tightly. Add another stem to the first two, this one vertically across the “X.” Add the last stem horizontally and twist it to the other stems to secure it. Help small children with the snowflake construction or make the bases and then have them thread the pony beads onto each chenille stem to fill them completely. When about 1/2 inch of stem remains, instruct them to stop adding beads and bend the stem around the last bead to secure it. Tie a length of string to the snowflake for hanging and let your little ones hang their snowflakes around the house.

Old-Fashioned Snow Globe

Those snow globes that you enjoyed shaking when you were a child make a comeback with this simple craft project that will delight your children. You’ll need a pint-size glass jar with a screw-top lid, a small plastic figurine or tree, a hot-glue gun and some white or silver glitter. Take the lid off the jar and set it on a work surface with the inside facing up. Position the plastic figurine on the center of the jar lid and glue it securely with the hot-glue gun yourself — hot glue and children shouldn’t mix — and wait for the glue to cool completely. Fill the jar with cool water to about 1 inch from the top. Stir in 1 teaspoon of glitter and swirl it around gently with a spoon. Your youngsters will love the stirring and swirling task. Squeeze a thread of hot glue around the inside edge of the cap and screw it onto the jar tightly before the hot glue cools. Allow the jar to sit undisturbed for a few minutes to give the glue time to set completely. Show your kids how to give the jar a shake and set it upside down to watch the glittery snow swirl around the figurine.

About the author:

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator and regular contributor to "Natural News." She is an accomplished gardener, seamstress, quilter, crocheter, painter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator and she enjoys technical and computer gadgets. Hatter's Internet publications specialize in natural health and she plans to continue her formal education in the health field, focusing on nursing.. Follow him on Twitter / Facebook.